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05 November 2011

Karaoke of revolution

At first glance, an alliance of anarchists and government might appear to be somewhat paradoxical. But the formal convergence in Oakland makes explicit the movement's aims: They're anarchists for statism, wild free-spirited youth demanding more and more total government control of every aspect of life — just so long as it respects the fundamental human right to sloth.

What's happening in Oakland is a logical exercise in class solidarity: the government class enthusiastically backing the breakdown of civil order is making common cause with the leisured varsity class, the thuggish union class and the criminal class in order to stick it to what's left of the beleaguered productive class.

It's a grand alliance of all those societal interests that wish to enjoy in perpetuity a lifestyle they are not willing to earn. Only the criminal class is reasonably upfront about this. The rest — lifetime legislators, unions defending lavish and unsustainable benefits, "scholars" whiling away a somnolent half-decade at Complacency U — are obliged to dress it up a little with some hooey about "social justice" and whatnot.

[...]

It's the voice of youth, yet everything about it is cobwebbed.

It's more like an open-mike karaoke night of a revolution than the real thing. I don't mean just the placards with the same old portable quotes by Lenin et al., but also, say, the photo in Forbes of Rachel, a 20-year-old "unemployed cosmetologist" with remarkably un-cosmetological complexion, dressed in pink hair and nose ring as if it's London, 1977, and she's killing time at Camden Lock before the Pistols gig.

Except that that's 3 1/2 decades ago, so it would be like the Sex Pistols dressing like the Andrews Sisters. Are America's revolting youth so totally pathetically moribund they can't even invent their own hideous fashion statements?

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